Hanna, 22, Sweden.
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2014 Book Challenge
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“Bibliotropic. Like sunflowers are heliotropic, they naturally turn towards the sun. We naturally turn towards the bookshop.”

—   Among Others, Jo Walton  (via ablogwithaview)

(Source: booksturnmugglesintowizards, via excusedfromthis)

lacigreen:

daisiesforprudence:

rubyreed:

A few of my favorite activities.

i like how they put capitalism in fun letters

i rly need this framed on my wall

lacigreen:

daisiesforprudence:

rubyreed:

A few of my favorite activities.

i like how they put capitalism in fun letters

i rly need this framed on my wall

(via hermionejg)

hermionejg:

merkkultra:

do men have resting bitch faces as well or do they not have negative characteristics ascribed to them for putting on a neutral rather than a deliriously happy facial expression

I actually said, “WELL, SHIT!” aloud.
Love, someone with a bitchy resting face.

“I began to realize how important it was to be an enthusiast in life. If you are interested in something, no matter what it is, go at it full speed ahead. Embrace it with both arms, hug it, love it and above all become passionate about it. Lukewarm is no good.”

—   Roald Dahl

(Source: onlinecounsellingcollege, via hermionejg)

hannaevero:

Project “Genre Swap”

What happens when you change the genre of a book? How do you visually translate a book from one genre to another while still keeping the spirit of the book?

Project “Genre Swap” explores and challenges the meaning of genres and how they look. 

Ernest Hemingway’s classic “A Moveable Feast” borrows the playful and approachable aesthetic of chick lit, E. L. James’ erotic novel “Fifty Shades of Grey" gets a poetic and dramatic makeover to explore the book’s core theme of dominance/submission, and Stephanie Meyer’s unfathomably popular "Twilight" grows up to be a classic.

Idea, art direction and illustration by Hanna Säll Everö, illustration for “A Moveable Feast” by Frida Dahlgren.

frida-dahlgren:

Comic for Mikaela, whose super power seems to be looking amazing IN EVERY HAT EVER. And also punching sexists in the face!

frida-dahlgren:

Neon Jungle-inspired calligraffiti because it has been waaaay too long!
Braveheart.

frida-dahlgren:

Neon Jungle-inspired calligraffiti because it has been waaaay too long!

Braveheart.

“She hated the namelessness of women in stories, as if they lived and died so that men could have metaphysical insights.”

—   Chad Harbach, The Art of Fielding  (via glittergheist)

(Source: fissionaccomplished, via hermionejg)

daughter-of-the-stars:

"You hit like a girl," the strong female character says

"Stop being such a girl," the strong female character says

"Man up," the strong female character says

"Shut the fuck up," I whisper

(via inturretandtree)

madelineyo:

pocketspooks:

locksandglasses:

I remember when I thought people in their 20’s were adults. Now all of my friends are in their 20’s and everybody is just kind of fumbling around bumping into each other, trying to figure out where the free food is

image

Excellent gif use

(via hermionejg)

I’m gonna do a tag to show I’m still a human being. Got this from Monica and you know.. books. Always relevant to my interests.

RulesIn a text post, list ten books that have stayed with you in some way. Don’t take but a few minutes, and don’t think too hard — they don’t have to be the “right” or “great” works, just ones that have touched you. Then tag ten other folks; you all know how this goes.

  1. Harry Potter, forever and always.
  2. How I Live Now, by Meg Rosoff.
  3. Middlesex, by Jeffrey Eugenides.
  4. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green.
  5. On the Jellicoe Road, by Melina Marchetta.
  6. Never Let Me Go, by Kazuo Ishiguro.
  7. 84, Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff.
  8. The Book Thief, by Markus Zusak.
  9. The Tales of the Otori series, by Lian Hearn.
  10. Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, by Jonathan Safran Foer.

I tag Frida and Mikaela and anyone else who wants to do it.

dozens-of-us:

angelclark:

How To Read A 223-Page Novel In Just 77 Minutes 

Spritz is a company that makes a speed-reading technology which allows you to get through a mass of text, reading every word, in a fraction of the time it would take if you were turning the pages of a book or swiping through a Kindle.

The basis of Spritz concept is that much of the time spend reading is “wasted” on moving your eyes from side to side, from one word to the next. By flashing the words quickly, one after the other, all in the same place, eye movement is reduced almost to zero. All that’s left is the time you take to process the word before the next one appears.

The company is selling licenses for other companies who might want to use the technology in operating systems, applications, wearables, and websites. Obviously, the tiny screen of a smart watch instantly springs to mind.

But the real revelation of Spritz is in trying it yourself.

Dear God.

(Source: noarmycanstopanidea.com, via booksandquills)

“Changing the way we talk is not political correctness run amok. It reflects an admirable willingness to acknowledge others who once were barely visible to the dominant culture, and to recognize that something that may seem innocent to you may be painful to others.”

—   

David Plotz, Why Slate Will No Longer Refer to Washington’s NFL Team as the Redskins

This is the most important thing to understand: something that may seem innocent to you may be painful to others

(via howtofightloneliness)

(Source: dancingwithdiversity, via girlslikebands)